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Dec 4, 2023Liked by Armand D'Angour

The original is tinted with grief, the English translation seems to reminisce of times that were good and now gone. It is true that translations are not the same as the original but it is also true that good scholars are artists of a kind. Art is always interpreted by those who see it or hear it and find a "truth" in that interpretation. So bravo to all those who, including you professor, help us through the gates of understanding.

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Dec 3, 2023Liked by Armand D'Angour

A very good point. Εἶπέ τις is not "they told me" because singular is not plural, and this translation is so widely known that it obscures our view of the original. And even when the translation is right ... someone was trying to sell Tennyson's translation of the end of iliad 8 as being as good as the original. He has "look beautiful" for φαίνετ’ ἀριπρεπέα. Correct, but also not poetically even close.

It's impossible to say this without sounding snobbish and gatekeeping, but the only honest answer to What is the best translation of Homer (or any other Greek poet) is, none of them. Looking Into Chapman's Homer is better than nothing, but only just.

I say this as someone who thinks that War and Peace is the best novel I have ever read, and I don't read a word of Russian, so I am acutely aware that my own enjoyment of literature is limited by my failure to acquire foreign languages.

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Dec 3, 2023Liked by Armand D'Angour

Pictures of Lily :(

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This highlights and reminded nfs the true art of translations. How important it is to get it right. Do you think modern translations of works are necessary and relevant to grasp the works better or in a new light?

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Thank you. I love hearing the sound of the original.

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